The Switzerland of Mexico: Mazamitla

A tranquil, picturesque city surrounded by pine forest and Chapala lake in the state of Jalisco, Mexico. Mazamitla, is a tiny municipality and situated 124 km off from Guadalajara. When I was in Guadalajara visited that city in a weekend. 



A brief history about the city.  The name 'Mazamitla' derives from the Nahualt language. This language is native to Central Mexico since at least the 7th century CE. The word Mazamitla is a combination of "Mazatl" means deer, "Mitl" means arrow and "tlan" means place and name Mazamitla signifies the history of the culture. Some of views are there to interpret the culture such as it is place "Where deer are hunted with arrows" or "Where deer hunting arrows are made".


The city is relatively unknown internationally and due to its scenic beauty, natural fabulous view it earned the name Switzerland of Mexico. You can enjoy the whole day in the city by walking, having coffee in the beautifully decorated cafes, get warm yourself in front of fireplaces at cool night. 



Fire place inside the hotel Ana Victoria


If you are searching serenity it is obvious here, far away from the hustle of daily life. I have started from Guadalajara by bus and reached Mazamitla within 3 hours. The city is in quite elevated from the sea level so the weather is really cool and awesome. 

The beautiful decoration of inner wall by plantings of the cafe El Cafecito near the centro.



After getting down from the bus started to explore the city, suddenly found am awesome small cafe where the inner walls are decorated with planting. Had a cappuccino and one slice of handmade carrot cake. Just after having trails in the rocky  inclined roads I was mesmerised with the beautiful architecture of the house. 

Building painted in burgundy and white in the city.



The market place, restaurants are also painted in burgundy-white. 


As every city has its own uniqueness so Mazamitla is also unique in design and architecture of the houses. When you will walk into the city can see the all the buildings are painted in white and burgundy colours. The building are constructed in wooden design where as the doors of each building is elaborately design in wood pieces. 

There is a museum and souvenirs shop where mainly wooden framework, candle, stones decoration are selling. The complete building is made-up by woods. As the city is surrounded by pine trees so plenty of wooden structures can be found in everything's.


The entrance of the museum and souvenirs. 



Inside view of the two storey wooden architecture museum. 


Candle holding in wooden structure in the souvenirs


Candle in stone body.

Due to plenty of woods, here only the coffins for finery box are available 





Rising in front of the plaza is the Parroquia de San Cristóbal, one of the country’s most handsome buildings. The church is an architectural anomaly in Mexico – it draws inspiration from the Far East rather than Europe. Built in the middle of the 20th century, the temple is painted white and burgundy so it corresponds with the surrounding buildings.



I don't prefer to book my accommodation before reaching the place. Because it depends where I want to stay. As usual I started to roaming around the city and searching the suitable to place spend the night..... And I got an homestay 'Ana Victoria', which is 1 km far from the downtown. After struggling with the owner in Nahualt language some how I managed my shelter for the day to that homestay.



Next day during exploration the city I get to know about the water falls Cascada El Salto. A 30-meter waterfall of El Salto is a must see of Mazamitla which is located in El Tabardillo Ecological Park.  More energetic travellers can hike the entire route and a round trip that takes around five hours. 


The direction and route map for water falls Cascada El Salto



I went there by walk and it took approximately 2 hours to reach at the base of waterfall. During return it was too hard to walk in the rocky surface and luckily I got toy train from half of path to back in the city. Usually visitors arrange to take a car to the entrance and walk or rent a horse to cover the remaining distance.

Cautions: Wear sensible, sturdy footwear and bring some food and drink though there are some fruits stalls near the waterfall.

Where to stay: Adjacent to bus stand there are few hotels. But I was in a homestay called Hotel Ana Victoria, though the name is started by 'hotel' but it is a homestay. 

How to reach: As I like to travel in public transport and get a bus from  Guadalajara. You can hire a cab to take your car to reach Mazamitla.


Regarding food  Mazamitla has plenty to offer the hungry tourist, from simple pizza spots to elegant, rustic restaurants.







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